Thomson,  William D.

Thomson, William D.

Male 1802 - 1877  (75 years)

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  • Name Thomson, William D.  [1, 2
    Born 04 Apr 1802  Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 03 May 1877  Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Cause: Heart Disease, 2 months 
    Person ID I396  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree | Mary and David Thomson Descendant
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 

    Father Thomson, David,   b. 30 Sep 1763, Nethernock, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jun 1834, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Glendinning, Mary,   b. 28 Jan 1768, Meikleholm, Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Nov 1847, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 30 Nov 1787  Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Documents
    St. Andrews Cemetery Map
    St. Andrews Cemetery Map
    Histories
    Descendants of David Thomson and Mary Glendenning
    Descendants of David Thomson and Mary Glendenning
    Family ID F125  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Lewis, Isabella,   b. 1806, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jul 1888, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Children 
     1. Thomson, David W.,   b. 22 Dec 1828, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 31 Mar 1901  (Age > 73 years)  [natural]
     2. Thomson, Bridget,   b. 24 Nov 1830, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Dec 1910  (Age 80 years)  [natural]
    +3. Thomson, William W.,   b. 1832, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Apr 1900  (Age 68 years)  [natural]
    +4. Thomson, Joseph W.,   b. 23 Nov 1834, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Nov 1915, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)  [natural]
     5. Thomson, Mary L.,   b. 1836, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Dec 1895  (Age 59 years)  [natural]
     6. Thomson, Richard W.,   b. Dec 1838, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Nov 1878  (Age ~ 39 years)  [natural]
    +7. Thomson, Robert W.,   b. 07 Jun 1843, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Apr 1916, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)  [natural]
     8. Thomson, Isabella,   b. 03 Jun 1848, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Nov 1848  (Age 0 years)  [natural]
    +9. Thomson, Archibald W.,   b. 16 Jan 1852, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Dec 1941  (Age 89 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F176  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 04 Apr 1802 - Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Heart Disease, 2 months - 03 May 1877 - Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Thomson, William D House
    Thomson, William D House

    Documents
    Thomson, William D. Birth Record
    Thomson, William D. Birth Record

    Headstones
    Thomson, William D Grave Stone
    Thomson, William D Grave Stone

    Family Crest
    Thomson Family Crest
    Thomson Family Crest
    This famous surname is regarded as being of "Crusader" origins, and found in every European country. That is to say it is a name associated with the Christian Faith, and one whose popularity followed the twelve Crusades by the knights of St John, under the command of various European kings in particular Richard, Coeur de Lyon, of England, to free the Holy Land from the Muslim. All the Crusades were unusuccessful, but it was not for want of gallantry, on either side. Returning knights, as a reminder of their efforts, gave their children names associated with the Bible. One of the most popular was Thomas. This was an Aramaic byname meaning "twin", and borne by one of Christ's disciples. Prior to the Crusades the name Thomas was found only as a priest name, but thereafter became one of the most popular male personal names, generating a wide variety of surnames. The patronymic forms from diminutives, such as Thomson (the Scottish form) and Thompson, found mainly in England and Northern Ireland, appear firstly in the 14th Century, the first recording being from Scotland. The intrusive "p" of the English and Irish forms was for easier pronunciation, and the wild fable about "p" meaning prisoner, is total rubbish. If "p" did imply prisoner, every name would have one! One of the earliest recordings is that of John Thompson in the charters of the Abbey of Whitby, Yorkshire, in 1349, whilst amongst the early church recordings is the marriage of David Thompson and Mary Clarke on May 29th 1664 at St. Giles Cripplegate, in the city of London. The first recorded spelling of the family name in any spelling is believed to be that of John Thomson, which was dated 1318, in the Annals of Scotland. This was during the reign of King Robert 1st of Scotland, known as "The Bruce", 1306 - 1329. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Notes 
    • 1 ST. ANDREWS RD. What: A pre-Confederation house in Scarborough built by a son of the area's first settlers, David and Mary Thomson. Asking price: $585, 000 Taxes: $3, 173 (2006)

      The property: This fieldstone house was built in 1848 by William Thomson, the eighth of 12 children born to David and Mary Thomson, the first settlers in Scarborough. The house is one of five designated heritage buildings ? including St Andrew's Presbyterian Church ? located just north of Highland Creek along St Andrews Road, making the tree-lined street one of the most historic in the area.

      Amenities: The home has three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a living room with fireplace, a library, a study and an open nook with a closet on the second floor that is used as a sewing room. The lower-level kitchen has an open-hearth fireplace and access to the formal dining room. There is also a cellar, workshop, laundry room, mudroom and an attached, oversized garage. The electrical service has been upgraded to 400-amp.

      David and Mary Thomson arrived in New York, USA around 1792 and entered Canada in 1795, eventually moving to York, or what is now Toronto, where David worked as a stonemason on the Parliament buildings. The couple first settled near the mouth of the Don River. But because of the danger of malaria, they moved to higher ground, amid the forest surrounding Highland Creek, which was then wider and stronger, and supported sawmill operations.

      A log cabin was built for them in 1796, followed in 1815 by a larger home on what is now St Andrews Road. At one point, David farmed about 600 Acres, a large portion of which was donated to the nearby Church and now makes up Thomson Memorial Park, which features sports fields, a nature trail and a collection of historic homes near the Scarborough Historical Museum.

      In 1848, William built his own home there, calling it "Bonese" after the family Farm in Bentpath, Scotland. A few years later, his cousin constructed a brick house on a separate property on the road, also designated a heritage home.

      Members of the Thomson family occupied the house built by William until 1970, when the last occupant ? David's great granddaughter, Dr. Isabella Davidson ? died. She was a well-known member of the community, being the first woman in Scarborough to graduate (1902) with a degree in medicine.

      Unlike other historic homes in the city, this one has a sizable 90- by 174-foot Lot, which features a large front yard and a backyard with a patio, gazebo and small pond, with room left to install an in-ground pool, agent Charles Ferreira says. The current owners purchased the home in 1985 and raised two children as well as grandchildren there, he notes.

      The home is called a "bank house" as the north and west portions are built into the Highland Creek embankment. All three floors are above ground, although that is true of the lower level only at the rear. The front entrance leads into the second floor.

      With 18-inch stone walls and extra-deep windowsills, the quality of construction compares favourably with and in some ways even surpasses homes built today. Soft mortar was used to allow for expansion and contraction.

      The original beamed ceilings can be seen in the lower-level kitchen and dining room. "They're as straight today as they were 160-years ago, " Mr. Ferreira says. The tiger maple cupboards were made from the wood of trees cut down in the surrounding forest.

      The main floor (above the lower level) includes a living room, study and library. Many of the original walls and door frames have been maintained, but the sleeping quarters in the centre were opened up in 1920 to add stairs to a third-storey addition where the bedrooms are now located. The house now has about 3, 600 square feet of living space.

      Other original features include some of the windows, the crane in the kitchen's fireplace and some door latches. Pieces authentic to the period were used to replace any missing or damaged hardware.

      As for modern conveniences, there is 400-amp electrical service, air conditioning and laundry facilities, as well as updated kitchen appliances, sink and cabinetry.

      The residential area is well-served by public transit and nearby Highway 401, as well as by schools, a hospital and the Scarborough Town Centre.

      Mr. Ferreira expects potential buyers will have a passion for Canadian history, like the current owners, who were both board members of the Scarborough Historical Museum.

      "The new owners will enjoy a sense of history, art and the amenities of a well-constructed home that may last another 160 years, " he says. "You're buying a historic home, but in a modern context."

  • Sources 
    1. [S198] Heritage Scarborough and the Scarborough Archives, Scarborough Historical Society, (Name: P. O. Box 593, Station A, Scarborough, ONTARIO M1K 5C4;).

    2. [S207] Ian Glendinning [glendinningfamily@tiscali. co. uk].
      http: www. cults. freeserve. co. uk ancestry

    3. [S1] Ontario: Birth, Death and Marriage Records.

    4. [S207] Ian Glendinning [glendinningfamily@tiscali. co. uk].
      Westerkirk Parish, 1750-1799 Marriages, Dumfries-shire, Scotland