Laughlen,  David Thompson

Laughlen, David Thompson

Male 1860 - 1916  (56 years)

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  • Name Laughlen, David Thompson  [1, 2, 3
    Born 15 Mar 1860  Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Occupation Cement Factory  [1
    Occupation Foxboro, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Saw Mill 
    Occupation 1881  [4
    Farmer 
    Religion 1881  [4
    C. Methodist 
    Residence 1881  Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Origin 1881  [4
    Scottish 
    Occupation 1882  [5
    Mechanic 
    Occupation Between 1892 and 1897  Hungerford, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Farmer, 70 Acres 
    Occupation 1902  Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    General Store 
    Occupation Between 1908 and 1918  [1
    Built and Operated Bakery 
    Died 14 Nov 1916  Belleville, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Belleville, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I254  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree | The History of Alexander V Laughlen
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2018 

    Father Laughlen, George,   b. 14 Feb 1827, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Oct 1911, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Edgerton, Elizabeth,   b. 1836, Fermanagh, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Sep 1911, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 1853  Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F49  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Morton, Eliza,   b. 24 Oct 1864, Thomasburg, Greater Napanee, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 May 1935, Belleville, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 25 Dec 1882  Napanee, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Witness Estella Martin of Napanee 
    Witness Eva Card of Napanee 
    Children 
     1. Laughlen, Ethel May,   b. 6 Nov 1884, Tweed, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     2. Laughlen, George Franklin,   b. 30 May 1888, Foxboro, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 May 1946, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)  [natural]
    +3. Laughlen, Thomas Newton,   b. 23 Aug 1890, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    +4. Laughlin, Edgerton Ross,   b. 23 Jun 1892, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Oct 1969, Catasauqua, Lehigh, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)  [natural]
    +5. Laughlin, Egbert Carmen,   b. 27 May 1894, Hungerford, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    +6. Laughlen, Jennie,   b. 1 Aug 1896, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     7. Laughlen, Mabel Mildred,   b. 18 May 1899, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     8. Laughlen, Jannie,   b. 1 Jun 1899, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    +9. Laughlin, John David,   b. 6 Apr 1902, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Aug 1968  (Age 66 years)  [natural]
     10. Laughlen, William Ernest,   b. 3 Sep 1905, Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Mar 1995, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)  [natural]
     11. Laughlen, Blake Morton,   b. 27 Jan 1911,   bur. Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2018 
    Family ID F173  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 15 Mar 1860 - Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Saw Mill - - Foxboro, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1881 - Hastings, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 25 Dec 1882 - Napanee, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Farmer, 70 Acres - Between 1892 and 1897 - Hungerford, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - General Store - 1902 - Marlbank, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 14 Nov 1916 - Belleville, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Belleville, Hastings, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Family Crest
    Laughlen Family Crest
    Laughlen Family Crest

  • Notes 
    • He was a Labour, but handy at many tasks. He and Eliza lived a short time at Tweed, Ontario, then moved to Foxboro, Ontario, where he worked in a saw mill. Next moved to Marlbank where he worked at the cement factory and farmed a few years. Next moved to Pointe Anne, Ontario, where he worked at a cement factory. From 1892-1897 they owned a Farm of about 70 Acres on 2nd line of Hungerford Twp., near Marlbank. In 1902 they bought a general store at Marlbank which was operated until 1908. They built a bakery at Pointe Ann, Ontario and operated it until 1918. They were Methodists. He attended the public School in Marlbank, but received little education as his parents were poor and he had to help support the rest of the family. However, he was able to read and write and was very fond of reading good books. When he first started to work he worked at various jobs most of which were of a labouring nature. In his younger days his clothes were made by his mother of homespun. He was fond of music and while still a boy he learned to play the violin and fife. He learned to play the fiddle well enough that he played at public entertainments on a few occasions. He was very industrious and thrifty, seldom laid off work and saved his money. His morals were of the highest type. He was rather shy among women, was not addicted to drinking and would not permit his family to have cards and alcoholic beverages in the home and would not allow his children to dance. He did not gamble, swear or lie, but smoked a pipe most of his life. His mother and Father both smoked. He had a very bad temper which he was not always able to control. Although he never openly professed Christianity in Church, he attended Methodist Church quite regularly and made his family attend also. He observed the Sabbath day strictly, abstaining from all work and play on that day and his children were not permitted to desecrate the Sabbath in any way. He was firm with his children and if they disobeyed him a good old-fashioned whipping befell them. He was somewhat peculiar about his food. He would not eat any sweetened foods, such as pies, cakes, candy, ice-cream, etc. In order to put some money away for a time of necessity, he lived within his income which was always small. I remember when he worked in a cord-wood shanty for $8.00 a month and board. About the year 1901 he worked ten hours a day for 90 cents during the winter months. Although he reared a family of 10 children he was able to save enough money to buy a general store in 1903 and later on, about 1908 he erected a bakery at Point Anne. He usually raised his own vegetables, cut his own fire-wood in the woods, kept a cow, pig, poultry, etc. and rarely had any expenditures for labor. He seldom had time to indulge in hobbies being kept busy most of the time in his garden or at his wood-pile nevertheless he was very fond of fishing and hunting. He generally used this Father's gun which was a long single-barreled muzzle-loading shotgun. In stature he was about 5 feet 7 inches tall and weighed about 155 pounds. On 25 Dec 1882 he was married to Eliza Morton of Tweed by a Methodist minister at Nappanee, Ontario. By this marriage there were ten children. After their marriage they lived for a time in Tweed and here Ethel was born. Then they moved to Foxboro and David worked in a saw mill. Here George was born. Then they moved to Marlbank and here Newton and Ross were born, but in different houses. Up to this time they had always lived in rented houses, but in the fall of 1892 they bought a small Farm about three miles south of Marlbank and paid part down on it, but did not have enough money to pay in full. They lived on this Farm about five years and in that time saved enough to completely pay for it. On this Farm and in the same Farm house Egbert and Jennie were born. The Farm was small, but in one corner was a nice grove of maples and every spring they make many gallons of nice maple syrup. Most of the work on the Farm was done manually. Most of the grain was cradled and sometimes it was threshed with a flail. Some seasons a horse power threshing outfit called and did the threshing. Prices of all kinds of Farm produce were low then. Milk cows could be bought for about 15 to 20 dollars; eggs were about 15 cents a dozen and other goods corresponded in price. During the winter when work on the Farm was slack he worked for others. They owned a team of horses one of which was an ugly brute and difficult to catch. One time while David was trying to catch this horse it wheeled and kicked him in the temple causing a very bad wound. For amusement and to make a little money he used to trap along the creek that ran through the Farm and in the swamps bordering the creek. One time he wounded a mink and attempted to kill it with the, butt of a muzzle loading shot gun he carried and which his Father carried when he was a boy too, but in killing the mink he broke the stock of the gun. At other times he trapped weasels and skunks that often visited the chicken coup. One day a large flock of tame pigeons alighted on the barn and in one shot he brought down a dozen or more and the family had a good pot pie next day. They got on amicably with the neighbors. A family named Bowen lived closest and frequently Dan Bowen would come to the house and he would beat the drum while David played the fife. Bowens used to catch woodchucks and ate them, but David would never try them nor squirrel nor rabbit. In those days they occasionally ate goose and turkey eggs as well as hen’s eggs. One winter four of the children Newton, Ross, Egbert and Jennie had whooping cough at the same time and you can imagine what a time there was. One fall David was taken ill in the evening with acute rheumatism and he was in bed for about six months. During most of that time he was helpless, being unable to move or help himself in any way. Growing tired of the Farm they sold it to a neighbor, Wilson Wales, and rented a house from George Young, the house being a few rods north east of the cement works. David began to work at the cement factory. In this house two children were born, Mabel and John. They lived in this home about five years. They had a good garden and there were a number of apple trees too. Up to this time the sewing for the family was done by hand, but while here they bought a sewing machine. Wages were low now. Some times he received, but 90 cents for ten hours of work in the winter months, but was glad to get even that much as work was scarce. While they lived here Jennie got lost in the woods while she was picking flowers and she was not found for a number of hours. Many of the neighbors joined in the search and she was finally found by the School Teacher. She had wandered through the woods until she was seen by a wood chopper who picked her up and carried her to his home. Altogether she strayed away four or five miles. The cement works burned down too while they lived here. David got an idea into his head that he would like to move to western Canada and homestead a half section of land so in 1901 he went to Alberta and spent a few days near Calgary and Red Deer, but in rained most of the time he was there and he came home disappointed with that part of the country. Next they bought a general store in the Village of Marlbank. They bought the stock from Arthur Burrows, but the building they rented from William Burley. Here William was born. The Wife and children conducted the business while David continued to work at the cement works. This business venture was not a good success. Too much credit was allowed and often the creditors were worthless and the Village had too many stores. One year the Orange celebration was held in Marlbank and that day was one of the busiest while they owned the establishment. Across the street was a hotel and one evening it burned down and as the store was very close it too came near burning and was on fire in different places, but the voluntary firemen were able to put out the flames. About 1907 they began to look about for some other business. David make a trip to northern Ontario and looked over prospects in Cochrane, Maileybury, and New Liskeard, but did not find anything to his liking. The family were beginning to leave home and work for themselves. Ethel began teaching music and painting in the neighboring villages. George left to attend School in Tweed, but later on began clerking in a hardware store in Tweed under the supervision of his uncle Alfred. Newton began working in a bakery in Tweed owned by Sam Rollins, later on he worked in bakeries in Kingston. In the fall of 1907 David went to Point Anne and took along Bert and Alonzo Jackson, a carpenter from Marlbank. They erected a bakery and the following spring the rest of the family moved to Point Anne, having previously disposed of the stock in the store. George returned home from Tweed to conduct the business and the whole family except Ethel and Newton were at home again. When the business was properly established David began to work at the Lehigh cement works in Point Anne and there received higher wages than at any other place. The bakery business was prosperous. In this house and bakery Blake was born. After a few years George left home to attend School at Albert College Belleville and later on at Queens University Kingston. Meanwhile Newton returned home from Kingston and the business was conducted by the children at home. David bought a Lot adjoining the bakery and two small houses theron. These he rented to workers at the cement factory. War broke out in 1914. Shortly after or shortly before this time David had his first stroke of apoplexy and before he died he had about a half dozen such strokes. He was never normal after the first stroke. There was a great change in his disposition. He became very irritable, could not concentrate and his memory was poorer. He partly recovered from the first stroke and began to work again at the cement works. His family begged him to rest and not do any work, but is was his nature to work and work he must. On 23 Sep 1912 Newton was married to Lillian Jamieson. About the autumn of 1914 George enlisted in Queens University medical corps and went overseas being in service at Folkestone Eng. and Cairo Egypt. As the attempt to capture Gallipoli was a failure the hospital at Cairo was closed and the troops sent back to Eng. After being in service a year George returned home to complete his medical course. On 31 Jan 1920 George was married to Vivienne Marvin of Canton Ontario In 1915 Ross left home to attend Albert college and attended that college about one and 1 2 years and Jennie attended at the same time. In the fall of 1916 he started his medical course at Toronto University. Meanwhile the business was being conducted by Newton and Bert, but in 1915 Newton moved to Toronto and Bert was left to carry on the business alone. In 1916 David had a number of strokes and became much worse. He was confined to bed for many months and most of this time was in a confused and helpless condition. He died on 14 Nov 1916 of apoplexy. The funeral was conducted at the house on 16 Nov 1916 and on the same day he was buried in Belleville Cemetery. Bert continued to conduct the business. He had been granted exemption a number of times, but in 1919 he was refused further exemption and was drafted in the army. He was stationed at Kingston for some time, but finally was dispatched overseas. The boat which embarked was wrecked in a fog on the coast of Nova Scotia near Halifax, but none of the troops were drowned. He reshipped and arrived safely in England. At first he was in the infantry, but transferred to the machine gun corps and while still in training the armistice was signed and he was sent home again. After returning home from overseas Bert lived at home and began work at the cement works at Point Anne. He was married to Elizabeth Cassibault of Otter Creek on 25 Oct After Bert left home there was no one to conduct the business as John and William were both going to School so the bakery was rented to Baxter and Carscallen, but later on Harold Baxter bought the place. The family then moved to a rented house on College St Belleville, the house being west of North Front St On 20 Jan 1918 Jennie married Herbert Whitfield and moved to her own home Later on Mrs. Laughlin and the remainder of the family moved to a house on the southwest corner of College and Grier Streets. At first they rented this place, but later on bought it. John went to high School in Belleville for a few years, but became disinterested and quit before completing matriculation. He was married to Geraldine Laura Lewis of Point Anne on 7 Mar 1925. Willie and Blake are still attending School in Belleville in 1925. On 13 Jul 1922 Ross was married to Mary Bowyer at Toronto. When I was a small boy we lived on a Farm on the 2nd Concession, Hungerford Township, Hastings County near Marlbank Ontario. While living on the Farm my Father was stricken with acute rheumatic fever. He spent several weeks in bed, had to be fed by my mother, couldn't turn over in bed without help from my mother and was almost completely helpless. Rheumatic fever frequently causes after effects on the heart, causing what is called vegetation’s to form on the valves of the heart. During the years 1915 and 1916 my Father had repeated small strokes from which he would partially recover, but eventually resulted in his death. I do not know the cause of his death as listed on his death certificate, but I feel certain the primary cause of his death was rheumatic heart disease which caused strokes or apoplexy.

  • Sources 
    1. [S424] The Works of M. E. Laughlin and E. R. Laughlin, 1955 2nd Edition, Mary Elizabeth Bowyer Laughlin and Edgerton Ross Laughlin.

    2. [S1] Ontario: Birth, Death and Marriage Records, Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Series: MS932; Reel: 601.
      Record for Egerton Ross Laughlin

    3. [S1] Ontario: Birth, Death and Marriage Records, Archives of Ontario; Series: MS929; Reel: 121.
      Record for Edgerton Russ Laughlin

    4. [S23] 1881 Canadian Census, taken April 4, 1881.

    5. [S287] Marriage Record.

    6. [S1] Ontario: Birth, Death and Marriage Records.