Glendinning,  Mary

Glendinning, Mary

Female 1768 - 1847  (79 years)

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  • Name Glendinning, Mary  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Born 28 Jan 1768  Meikleholm, Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4
    Gender Female 
    Baptism 01 Feb 1768  Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Find A Grave Memorial 13888055 
    Occupation Homemaker 
    Died 08 Nov 1847  Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Buried Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    • Saint Andrew's Presbyterian Church Cemetery
    Person ID I180  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree | Mary and David Thomson Descendant
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 

    Father Glendinning, James,   b. 16 Nov 1731, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 Jan 1810  (Age 78 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Beattie, Isabel,   b. 16 Jul 1744, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Sep 1816, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 01 May 1762  Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Family ID F161  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Thomson, David,   b. 30 Sep 1763, Nethernock, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jun 1834, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 30 Nov 1787  Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Children 
    +1. Thomson, James D.,   b. 29 Apr 1789, Nethernock, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Mar 1867, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)  [natural]
    +2. Thomson, Andrew D.,   b. 23 Nov 1790, Nethernock, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jul 1854, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)  [natural]  [unknown]
    +3. Thomson, Isabella,   b. 09 Jan 1793, Nethernock, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Aug 1872, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)  [natural]
    +4. Thomson, Richard D.,   b. 17 Oct 1794, Nethernock, Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Feb 1878, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)  [natural]
    +5. Thomson, Archibald D,   b. 02 Aug 1796, Newark, Niagara, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Dec 1877, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)  [natural]
    +6. Thomson, David D.,   b. 27 Feb 1798, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Oct 1852, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)  [natural]
    +7. Thomson, Jennet,   b. 18 May 1800, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jan 1862, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)  [natural]
    +8. Thomson, William D.,   b. 04 Apr 1802, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 03 May 1877, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)  [natural]
    +9. Thomson, John D.,   b. 10 Apr 1804, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 04 Dec 1888, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)  [natural]
    +10. Thomson, Mary,   b. 11 Jun 1807, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 Dec 1879, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)  [natural]
     11. Thomson, Helen,   b. 05 Aug 1809, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jul 1844, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years)  [natural]
    Documents
    St. Andrews Cemetery Map
    St. Andrews Cemetery Map
    Histories
    Descendants of David Thomson and Mary Glendenning
    Descendants of David Thomson and Mary Glendenning
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F125  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 28 Jan 1768 - Meikleholm, Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBaptism - 01 Feb 1768 - Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 30 Nov 1787 - Westerkirk, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 08 Nov 1847 - Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Glendinning, Mary Thomson
    Glendinning, Mary Thomson
    Glendinning Homestead In Scarbourough.
    Glendinning Homestead In Scarbourough.
    Glendinning, Mary Thomson
    Glendinning, Mary Thomson
    Thomson, David and Mary House
    Thomson, David and Mary House
    Thomson, David and Mary School
    Thomson, David and Mary School
    Thomson, David and Mary House 1
    Thomson, David and Mary House 1

    Documents
    Thomson, Mary Will dated July 24 1844
    Thomson, Mary Will dated July 24 1844

    Headstones
    Thomson, David and Mary Headstone Unveiling
    Thomson, David and Mary Headstone Unveiling
    Thomson, David Helen and Mary Glendinning Grave Stone
    Thomson, David Helen and Mary Glendinning Grave Stone

    Family Crest
    Glendinning Family Crest
    Glendinning Family Crest
    Recorded in several spellings including Glendenning, Glendining, and Glendinning, this is an ancient Scottish surname. It is locational from a place called Glendinning in the parish of Westerkirk, in the county of Dumfriesshire. The name derives from the Welsh "glyn" meaning "valley", "dun", a fort, plus "gwyn" white or fair, hence, "the valley of the white fort". The surname from this source is first recorded in the latter half of the 13th Century (see below). In the "Miscellany of the Scottish Historical Society" one, William de Glendonwyn is recorded as "procurator of the Scottish Nation in the University of Orleans (1408)". In the "Criminal Trials of Scotland" from A.D. 1487 to 1624 reference is made to the stealing of goods from a Bartholomew Glendunwyne (1504) and in the reign of Charles 1 (1625 - 1649) a John Glendinning had his lands forfeited when Montrose, the Kings's lieutenant, whom he supported was defeated. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Adam de (of) Glendonwyn which was dated C.1386, in the "Records of the Baronies of Clifton and Merbrtel". during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Notes 
    • Copy of Mary Thomson’s Will

      In the name of God, Amen, I, Mary Thomson, widow of the late David Thomson, Senior, of the Township of Scarborough in the Home district and Province of Canada, being mindful of the uncertainty of human life and in full possession of all my faculties do on Wednesday, the twenty-fourth day of July, in the year of our Lord, Eighteen Hundred and Forty-Four, make, publish and declare this my last Will and Testament in manner following

      First I give and bequeath to each of my sons, James Thomson, Andrew Thomson, Richard Thomson, Archibald Thomson, David Thomson, William Thomson, and John Thomson, the sum of Twenty Two pounds Lawful Currency of the aforesaid Province

      Secondly, I give and bequeath to each of my daughters, Isabella Thomson, Wife of Peter Little, Jennet Thomson, Wife of Andrew Johnston, Mary Thomson, Wife of John Walton, the sum of Twenty-Two pounds Lawful Currency of the aforesaid Province

      Thirdly, I give and bequeath to my Grandson, David Thomson, the eldest son of my eldest son, James Thomson, the sum of Twenty-pounds Lawful Currency of the aforesaid Province, likewise the clock on the south side of the house and one cow at present grazing at Richard Thomson’s, likewise two sheep to be selected from my flock of sheep by my Executors, and his GrandFather’s desk and chest

      Fourthly, I give and bequeath to my Grand-daughters VIZ., Mary Little, and Mary Thomson, daughters of my son, James Thomson, the sum of Five pounds each Lawful money of the aforesaid Province

      Fifthly, I further give and bequeath to my daughter, Jennet Thomson, Wife of Andrew Johnston, my daughter Helen’s Feather Bed, Bedstead and Curtains, along with four pairs of Blankets, two Pillows and one Quilt made out of a cloak and shawl

      Sixthly, I furthermore give and bequeath to my daughter, Isabella Thomson, Wife of Peter Little, a single feather bed, an old feather bed and two pillows along with three pairs of blankets and two chairs

      Seventhly, furthermore I give and bequeath to my daughter, Mary Thomson, Wife of John Walton, a feather bed and Bolster along with three blanket

      Eighthly, furthermore I give and bequeath to my son, James Thomson, Helen’s clock and his Father’s Family Bible, a bedstead and two chairs and red table.

      Ninthly, I give and bequeath to my son, Andrew Thomson the large kitchen table, two chairs and
      two sheep

      Tenthly, I give and bequeath to my son, Richard Thomson, a feather bed, one blanket and
      sugar kettle

      Eleventhly, I give and bequeath to my son, Archibald Thomson, the corner cupboard, two blankets and one chair

      Twelfthly, I give and bequeath to my son, David Thomson, one red painted table upstairs, one pair of blankets and two chairs

      Thirteenthly, I give and bequeath to my son, William Thomson, my large chair, two blankets, Helen?s sofa and all belonging to it

      Fourteenthly, I give and bequeath to my son, John Thomson, the large press in the corner of the house, two blankets and two feather pillows

      Fifteenthly, I furthermore give and bequeath to my son, David Thomson, the bedstead in the kitchen along with the curtains

      Sixteenthly, I furthermore give and bequeath to my grand-daughter, Mary Thomson, daughter of my son, James Thomson, one sheep, one quilt and one blanket

      Seventeenthly, all the rest and residue of my Personal Estate whatsoever and wheresever of what nature kind and quality so ever the same may be after the payment of my debts, Legacies and Funeral expenses. I will and direct to be divided equally among my sons and daughters

      Lastly, I nominate, Constitute and appoint the Reverend James George, Minister of the Presbyterian Church of Canada, in the Township of Scarborough, in the Home District and Province of Canada, George Scott and Robert Hamilton, of the Township District and Province aforesaid, Yeomen, Executors of this my last Will and Testament, Signed, Sealed, Published and delivered by the said Testatrix as and for her last and in the presense of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto:

      John Muir William Elliot her Mary X Thomson mark

      David and Mary Thomson Collegiate Institute Scarborough Board of Education
      2740 Lawrence Avenue, East M1P 2S7 Phone Number: 396-5525 Fax Number: 396-5524
      Founding year: 1959 Principal: Mrs. Rowan Vice-Principals: Mr. Milne, Mr. Lill Head of Guidance: Mr. Guscott Format: Gr. 9 (non-semestered), Gr. 10-OAC (semestered) Population: 980 Colours: Red, white, and black Team Name: Thomson Redmen

      David and Mary Thomson C. I History of Thomson C. I

      In 1959 when David and Mary Thomson C. I opened in Scarborough, it was the sixth secondary School in the borough. W. A Porter C. I, the fifth secondary School, had been opened the year before. These two years marked the beginning of the fantastically accelerating growth period in the Scarborough School system necessitated by the equally fantastic growth in business and industry and in the general population.

      Scarborough's first Director of Education, the late Dr. R. H. King, and the first Superintendent of Secondary Schools, the late A. E. Robinson were, of course, deeply involved in all new School planning. and one of their prime considerations was to develop multi-purpose buildings which could be used by the general public both during and outside of regular School hours. Hence the accessibility of such areas as the auditoria, the gymnasium, the library, the cafeteria, the offices, and in some schools the swimming pools became particularly important. So in the planning of Thomson, as with other schools, many hours were spent by the Board and the officials in meeting with the architects.

      Dr. King, a classical scholar, was deeply interested in history but particularly in local pioneer history. For this reason he strongly advocated naming this new School after the first white settlers in Scarborough. David and Mary Thomson. After the Board had accepted this suggestion a list was developed of present descendants of the Thomson family not only in Scarborough but in other parts of Canada and the USA as well. The School's secretarial department then typed hundreds of invitations to the official opening ceremonies.

      Surprisingly enough the event brought large numbers of Thomson relatives from all over the USA and Canada. The family tree was investigated in detail by enthusiastic groups who sometimes discovered aunts, uncles and cousins never known to each other before. In an effort to establish some sort of a permanent information bureau which could be consulted in future years, the meeting elected Dick Thomson, a lawyer and a popular resident of Scarborough, to accept the difficult task of working on this idea. Dick's aunt, the late Dr. Isabella Davidson, who had been a medical missionary in India, had vivid childhood memories of one of the early Thomson homes. A talented amateur artist, she painted a picture on one of these homes which she personally presented to the School at its First Commencement in 1960. Today this picture hangs in the main office. Later, other members of the family contributed pioneer artefacts for display in the School.

      As a classicist Dr. King had accumulated a large collection of Latin mottoes, many of which had already been adopted by existing schools as their own. Thus the problem became one of selecting a suitable motto for Thomson which was not already in use. Finally, "NIL SINE MAGNO LABORE" was selected as being the most appropriate. Certainly it expressed one of Dr. King's deepest convictions that nothing worthwhile can be accomplished without hard work. This motto was incorporated in the Thomson logo which continues in use at the present time. It appears at the base of a scarlet maple leaf on which is shown a lamp of learning and the initials D. and M. in white. The leaf is flanked by a large C. and I both in black. Finally, the name Thomson, white on a scarlet, background, surmounts the rest of the design. Embarrassingly enough, after these colours were selected, scarlet, black and white, it was realized that they were the same as those of Nazi Germany.

      At the time Thomson was in the planning stage, the potential for television in education was a popular topic for discussion but not much had been done about it. Here again Dr. King provided the incentive for experimentation and Thomson became the first secondary School in Scarborough, if not in Canada, to have TV cable incorporated in the structure of the building. Some of the earliest experiments in this system involved transmitting a display or experiment produced in one classroom simultaneously to several other classrooms. For example, a teaching model of the Shakespearean Globe Theatre was telecast in this way, as was the dissection of a frog from a science lab. Since that time the invention and perfection of video tape machines have entirely changed the original concept of educational TV

      As a new and innovative School in a new and rapidly growing metropolitan area where many opportunities for promotion were inevitable, Thomson attracted a wealth of applications from both experienced and inexperienced personnel for both Faculty and Secretarial positions. Staff connections with Malvern C. I in Toronto were so numerous that it was jokingly suggested that the School should be called David and Malvern instead of David and Mary.

      Despite the handicap of occupying a building still under construction, the School opened on time. the cafeteria was the only large area available for the first few weeks. Hence in addition to its primary purpose, it became a temporary assembly hall. The gymnasium and the auditorium were far from being finished. This confused situation was compounded by weekly and sometimes daily visits from groups of educators near and far who wished to see the TV experiment in action.

      The enthusiastic co-operation of the students and of the outstanding staff in overcoming these innumerable difficulties developed a School spirit, a spirit kindred to that of the pioneers who knew that "Nothing worthwhile could be accomplished without hard work". Long may this spirit continue to distinguish David and Mary Thomson Collegiate Institute

  • Sources 
    1. [S198] Heritage Scarborough and the Scarborough Archives, Scarborough Historical Society, (Name: P. O. Box 593, Station A, Scarborough, ONTARIO M1K 5C4;).

    2. [S207] Ian Glendinning [glendinningfamily@tiscali. co. uk].
      http: www. cults. freeserve. co. uk ancestry

    3. [S588] Scotland, Birth, Deaths and Marriage Archived.
      Record for Mary Glendining

    4. [S167] FindAGrave, (Name: www.findagrave.com;).
      Record for Mary Walton

    5. [S207] Ian Glendinning [glendinningfamily@tiscali. co. uk].
      Westerkirk Parish, 1750-1799 Marriages, Dumfries-shire, Scotland