Laughlen,  U. E. L. Alexander V.

Laughlen, U. E. L. Alexander V.

Male 1756 - 1822  (66 years)

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  • Name Laughlen, Alexander V.  [1, 2
    Title U. E. L. 
    Born 1756  Stirlingshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Emigration 1774  [1
    Scotland - New York, USA 
    Imprisoned 1777  Albany, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Captured by American Troops 
    Released 1780  [1
    Returned to New York, USA 
    Emigration 1788  Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Membership 12 Jul 1798 
    U. E. L. List, Midland District 
    Deeded 1803  [1
    Lot 17 (100 Acres) as Loyalist Concession 
    Deeded 1806  [1
    Lot 17 purchased Lot 28, 3rd Concession of Ernestown, 200 Acres 
    Deeded 1818  [1
    Lot 28 to son James Laughlin 
    Find A Grave Memorial 13882448 
    Name Laughlin 
    Died 30 Jan 1822  Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • 44°13'13.02"N 76°46'5.18"W
    • Lutheran Union Cemetery
    Person ID I14  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree | The History of Alexander V Laughlen
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 

    Family Snyder, Mary Lane,   b. 17 Apr 1760, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1798, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 37 years) 
    Married 24 Dec 1782  New Hackensack, Dutchess, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Laughlen, John Henry,   b. 16 Sep 1783, New Hackensack, Dutchess, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 Sep 1867, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)  [natural]
    +2. Laughlen, James,   b. 05 Mar 1785, New Hackensack, Dutchess, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jun 1850, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)  [natural]
     3. Laughlen, Elizabeth,   b. 09 Feb 1787, New Hackensack, Dutchess, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1798, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 10 years)  [natural]
    +4. Laughlin, Mary,   b. 10 Oct 1788, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1856 and 1878, Battersea, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)  [natural]
    +5. Laughlin, Hannah,   b. 19 Nov 1790, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Nov 1822, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years)  [natural]
    +6. Laughlin, Isaac Jacob,   b. 06 Nov 1792, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Mar 1881, Yarker, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)  [natural]
     7. Laughlin, Ronald,   b. Bef 1796, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 04 Sep 1834  (Age > 39 years)  [natural]
     8. Laughlin, Duncan,   b. Bef 1796, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 04 Sep 1834  (Age > 39 years)  [natural]
     9. Laughlin, Colin,   b. Bef 1796, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 04 Sep 1834  (Age > 39 years)  [natural]
    Histories
    The Complete Genealogy of Alexander Laughlen by Edgerton Ross Laughlin Published 1955 with updates
    The Complete Genealogy of Alexander Laughlen by Edgerton Ross Laughlin Published 1955 with updates
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F16  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1756 - Stirlingshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImprisoned - Captured by American Troops - 1777 - Albany, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 Dec 1782 - New Hackensack, Dutchess, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEmigration - 1788 - Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 30 Jan 1822 - Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Documents
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Book Registry
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Book Registry
    Laughlen, Alexander in the History of the of Lennox and Addington Page 163
    Laughlen, Alexander in the History of the of Lennox and Addington Page 163
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition1a
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition1a
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition1b
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition1b
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition1c
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition1c
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition2a
    Laughlen, Alexander 1798-Jul-12 Land Petition2a

    Headstones
    Laughlen, Alexander
    Laughlen, Alexander

    Histories
    Laughlen, Alexander Genealogy
    Laughlen, Alexander Genealogy

    Family Crest
    Laughlen Family Crest
    Laughlen Family Crest
    The surname MacLaughlin, also spelt Laughlin, Lauchlan, Laughlan, MacLoughlin and McLaughlin, is used in modern Irish as the Anglicization of an Old Gaelic name borne by two entirely distinct Gaelic septs, the first originally called 'O' Maoilsheachlann' and Anglicized as O'Melaghlin up to the end of the 17th Century assumed the name MacLoughun in circa 1691. The territory of this sept lay in the central plains of Ireland, especially in County Meath. The Gaelic prefix "O" indicates male descendant of, and "maol", the tonsured one, i.e. a devotee (of Saint Seachlann i.e. St. Secundinus). This Maoilsheachlann from whom the family descends was better known as Malachy 11, High King of Ireland from 980 - 1002. The second MacLaughlin sept belonged to Innishowen Co. Donegal. The name means "son of (mac) Lochlann", a compound of the Norse elements "loch", a lake or fjord, plus "lann" land. The great leading men of this sept are frequently referred to in "The Annals of the Four Masters". Among the recordings in Ireland is the marriage of John McLaughlin and Elizabeth Crauffurd on June 23rd 1666 at Derry Cathedral, Templemore, Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of MacLochlann of Ulster, which was dated circa 1200, in the Annals of Medieval History (Counties Donegal and Derry), during the reign of King Cathal, Craobhdhearg - known as Red Hand, High King of Ireland, 1198 - 1224. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Notes 
    • Most of the knowledge on the history of Alexander Laughlen and his descendants was obtained from the works of Dr. Edgerton Ross Laughlin, Canadian census reports and legal documents ("Petitions for Crown Lands") currently in the possession of the Public Archives, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada and New York, USA in the Revolution as Colony and State, p. 240. Book: The Loyalists in Ontario, Canada, William D. Reid, The Sons and Daughter of The American Loyalists of Upper Canada 971. 3 V. 23, page 178.

      A family history compiled in 1955 by M. E. Laughlin and E. R. Laughlin provides an abundance of information, which I have continued. The complete works has be included with this family tree and added on too. I have corrected, what I know to be true and left what they have written in the case of no further information has been found, or I have not researched that person as of yet. With the tools available to us in the 21st century that E. R. Laughlin did not have, many corrections have been made. www.SandiSullivan.com

      In this history, it is stated that Alexander and his Wife were buried in unmarked graves in a Cemetery near Odessa. M. E. Laughlin erected a headstone in the nearby Lutheran Union Cemetery, as a memorial to Alexander Laughlen. Lutheran Union Cemetery, Odessa, Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada is located at: Concession 11 Lot 16 (being Highway 133 and Millhaven Road, on Ham Road.) You can find a map on my Picture Page at www.SandiSullivan.com

      Some people would like to know the correct spelling out our name. Our earliest ancestor spelled his name Laughlen, but hat does not mean it is the correct way to spell the name. We know nothing about the about the parents, brothers and sisters, and other ancestors of Alexander Laughlen, so we do not know how they spelled their names. It is said a brother of Alexander Laughlen come out from Scotland and visited him when he lived in Ernestown, Ontario. Alexander Laughlen's son James Laughlen continued to spell his name Laughlen. His sons Jacob and John spelled their names Laughlen until after they married and moved away from home; after that they spelled their names McLaughlin and their descendants are still know as McLaughlin. Some members of the Laughlen family spell their name Laughlin. It does not make much difference how we spell our names; we are all member of the same fine family.

      All the following is from various sources. All documents quoted from i. e. : the Archives of Canada are word for word, as written. Over the years some researchers have corrected the spelling and grammar, but I have reverted back to as it is written. I have also put documentation is the order of date.

      Alexander Laughlin was born in 1756 in the province of Stirlingshire, Scotland. It is said that his parents were weavers. (NOTE: Other Scotland ancestors are still being researched). Alexander was likely a descendant of Maclauchlan of Auchintroig, in the shire of Stirling, this branch of the clan dating back to 1394. (as noted in "An account of the surname Maclauchlan" from "de Rebus Albanicis", Glasgow, 1723). It is reported by Dr. E. Ross Laughlin that a brother of Alexander visited his children, in Upper Canada after Alexander's death. The name of this brother is not known.

      In 1774, Alexander left Scotland and emigrated to America, landing at port of New York, USA Were he remain but a short time and then travelled up the Hudson River by bateau (flat bottomed boat) to Albany and finally settled in Ballston, Saratoga, New York, USA where he remained quietly until 1777, when turbulence and troubles arising out of the War of Independence caused him to go to the city of Albany where he enlisted in the Royal Americans. He enlisted in a corps then being formed under the authority of General Sir William Howe by Captain Daniel McAlpin of the 60th Regiment in joint action with Lieutenant Colonel William Edmonston of the 48th Regiment. Five hundred and seventy-two (572) men (Tories, loyalists to the King of Britain) quickly enrolled in this corps which was pulled together under the command of Major Daniel McAlpine. This corps was known as Major McAlpin's corps of Royal Americans, and was later called the Loyal Ranger

      In 1777, a detachment of Major McAlpin's corps under the command of Captain William Fraser, with Lieutenant Thomas Fraser, was ordered to proceed to Upper Canada from Albany. After ten days of marching, they were captured by a group of American troops and were taken to Albany. There, Alexander Laughlin was incarcerated in close confinement. During the next 3 years, he was kept a prisoner in various military prisons in New York, USA and the New England States and suffered many hardships. The following petitions from the Canadian archives illustrate these facts:

      The following is Land Petition: RC 1 (L-3) Volume 285 File Reel C-2125 File Number Petition 51 - 51 A - 51B Feb 1798 Bundle 4 Public Archives of Canada

      "I hereby Certify that the bearer Alex Laughlen has been taken prisoner with us when endeavored to come to Canada in the spring 1777 and carried prisoner to albany and from thence to new England where he suffered mutch for his loyalty and attachment to the british government given under our hands at Edwardsbury, this 9th day of February 1798. (Signed) Wm Fraser Captain Thomas Fraser, late Loyal Rangers. "

      "This is to Certify all Gentlemen Whom It may Concern That Alexander Laughlen Was a good faithful Subject To King George during the Last Rebellion and Sufered Domstick Vilence by the hands of the Userpeis Was taking Prisoner Going to the British And Was keep three years In Close Confinement Which was a Very hard fate And Now means to maake his Residence under protection of King George. Given Under my hand This twenty fourth Day of may and In the year of our Lord 1788 and The Twenty Eighth year of the Reign of Our Sovereign Lord George the third By the Grace of God, King of Great Britten France And Ireland, Defender of the Faith
      (Signed) James Dearin
      Lodewick Miller
      John Dearin
      John S. Penkney"

      History of the of Lennox and Addington, Page 163
      "Wednesday, April 14th, 1790, Charles Justin McCarty appears upon his recognizance taken upon information that he is a vagabond, imposter, and disturber of the peace. Witness for pro. Sworn Benj. Clapp. For Defendant, John Ratton, Wm. Williams, Emanuel Elderbeck, Alex. Laughlin, David Lent, Eliz. VanSickler, Florence Donovan. The court having heard the evidence for the prosecution, likewise the evidence for the defendant, will deliberate on the merits of the information against the defendant. The court having consulted with the Grand Jury, do order that the said Charles Justin McCarty shall, within the space of one month, leave this district and not return, and that the Sheriff of this district shall see this order duly executed. "

      "To His Honor Peter Russell Esqe - President Administering the Government of Upper Canada, Etc Etc Etc In Council
      Alexander Laughlen humbly prays to have his name put on the U. E. list, he being intitled to that benefit as will appear by Vouchers hereun to annexed. Kingston, 10th. May 1798 C. Robinson, atty. for Petitioner. " (End of Petition, Copy in Family Binder)

      The following is Land Petition: RG 1 (L-3) Volume 285 File Pettition Number 26 3 page UCLP Bundle 4 Reel C 2125 Public Archives of Canada

      The Honourable Robert Russel, in Council, administering the Government of Upper Canada.

      The Memorial of Alexander Laughlen humbly sheweth that whereas in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-four he left Stirlingshire in Scotland and came to America, that he settled in Ballstown, State of New York, USA and that in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven having voluntarily joined a party of Loyalists, was enlisted under Captain McAlpin and was put under the direction of Captain William Fraser and Lieutenant Thomas Fraser who had the command of said party on their way to Canada. That after ten days' march the party was surprised by the Rebells, taken prisoners and conducted to Albany. That your Memorialist remained in close confinement during three years; that having made sundry attempts to join the British standard without success, did remain in the Country until the close of the war. That having a young family it was extreme difficult for him to remove into Canada sooner than the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, that since he hath made application and did draw one hundred Acres of the first draft lands, on which he is settled in the Township of Ernest, Upper Canada, that his family at present consists of six souls - himself, three sons and two daughters; his Wife, a son and daughter being lately deceased. That your Memorialist hath only one hundred Acres of land and humbly prays that he may be allowed the residue of his right of land; and your Memorialist as in duty bound, will ever pray.
      Copy in Family Binder

      ENDORSED. No. 26
      Memorial of Alexander Laughlen July 12, 1789
      Recommended for 100 Acres in addition as U. E.
      J. E. "

      In 1775, New York, USA served as the capitol of the new USA. On February 6, 1778, New York, USA approved the Articles of Confederation and ratified the USA Constitution on July 26, 1788, during which time Alexander was still a prisoner of war.

      The following information is taken from "New York, USA in the Revolution as Colony and State, " (The Comptrollers Office, New York, USA). On page 240 Alexander Laughlin is listed as a British prisoner of war. Also listed are Alexander McLachlin and John McLachlin. The book states that prisoners were at times sent from New York, USA to Connecticut, USA, (Hartford, Litchfield and Sharon), to Massachusetts, (Springfield and Worcester), to New Hampshire and Pennsylvania. On Page 256, under "Estates Confiscated" are the names Captain McAlpin and Daniel McAlpin.

      In 1780 he was released. Upon returning to his home in lower New York, USA, he found that his land and property had been confiscated. While trying to begin again, he met Mary Snyder (also written as Schneider and Snider) (her last name is not confirmed but educated guess is that she belong to the Snider line. There is a 2 year gap in records in Dutchess, New York, USA records that would confirm this), and on December 24, 1782 they were married. IGI Fiche Z0001 marriage of Alexander to Mary Snyder sometimes Schneider, lists where some children were born.

      Mary was born on April 17, 1760 in New York, USA. They stayed in the New York, USA City area for a few years. Their first child, John, was born on September 16, 1783 in Poughkeepsie, Duchess, New York, USA. Their second son, James, was born on March 5, 1785, and records indicate he was christened in New Hackensack, Duchess, New York, USA. Their third child, Elizabeth, was born October 10, 1788 in Little White Creek, New York, USA. Their third son, name unknown, born about. 1784, died prior to 1788.

      By the fall of 1788, Alexander had begun to pack up his family, and along with other Loyalists (eventually some 30, 000) emigrated Northward out of New York, USA. They succeeded in traversing through the wilderness of Northern New York, USA by the Onondaga trail in the depths of winter, until reaching the shores of Lake Ontario, Canada. In the vicinity of Cape St Vincent they crossed the ice on sledges to the Canadian City of Kingston. They later settled about twenty miles from Kingston in Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada, Lennox Addington, Ontario, Canada.

      He had petitioned for and was granted land by the crown, he selected the West half of Lot 17, second Concession of Ernestown consisting of 100 Acres. The Certificate of Location of this land is dated October 18th, 1789. A few years later, Alexander donated a portion of this land for a Lutheran Church and Cemetery, later named Union Lutheran Church Cemetery.

      U. E. Loyalist by The United Empire Loyalist 1784 - 1884
      The soldiers at Adolphustown, Toronto and Niagara with an appendix, page 204. "Laughlin, Alexander, descendants - inserted by Order in Council 12 July 17 1789, was 10 days a soldier in McAlpin's Corps, taken prisoner, etc. "

      On April 22, 1806, Alexander left Lot 17 and purchased Lot 28, third Concession of Ernestown, consisting of 200 Acres, from Elizabeth O'Neil. She received this land from the British Crown by deed dated May 17, 1802 and on November 16, 1803, a deed for this land was granted by the British Crown to Alexander Laughlin. Alexander resided on it until his death on January 30, 1822

      This land was passed on to later generations. According to "The Loyalists of Ontario, Canada" (Reid, p. 178), Mary, John and James all of Ernestown, claimed land on February 27, 1818.

      On September 29, 1818, Alexander deeded Lot 28, third Concession of Ernestown to his son James Laughlin. James Laughlin by will dated November 2, 1838 devised the homestead to his two sons, John and Henry.

      Alexander Laughlen (grandson of the pioneer), eldest son of John Laughlin, was given the old homestead and he later sold or traded it to Harriet R. Booth by deed dated October 24, 1836.

      John Laughlin by deed dated February 25, 1851 conveyed his half interest in the homestead to his brother Henry Laughlin.

      Henry Laughlin must have willed the homestead to his Wife, Margaret Hymers Laughlin for on April 7, 1892, she deeded the homestead to her son Alexander Hymers Laughlin.

      Alexander Hymers Laughlin in turn deeded the homestead to his son Harry F. Laughlin who occupied the Farm in 1939. Note: Jonas Amey received a deed for the East half of Lot 17, in the second Concession of Ernestown from the British Crown on November 6, 1803. Descendants of this family married into the Laughlin family. Christopher Lake, I Also received a grant of land in Ernestown, Lennox, Ontario, Canada and his son, John Lake, married a daughter of Alexander Laughlen.

      Miscellaneous Notes
      Letter dated Ottawa, November 14 1930 to ER Laughlen

      Dear Sir; In reply to your letter of the 27th ultimo, transferred to this department by the Department of National Defense, I bet to say that I could not find nay record of the enlistment of Alexander Laughlen n Major McAlpines Corps., nor in any list of names of men who served in this Corps.

      McAlpines Corps was formed on the 1st. August 1777 by General Burgoynes orders and its men were recruited in Albany. On the 17th. June and on the 3rd. August 1778 it was stationed at Québec, Canada; on the 26th. September 1778 a detachment belonging to McAlpines arrived at Sorel from St John.

      The following document describes McAlpin's Corps and shows that anyone who enlisted in it lost everything they had, as their property was confiscated. Reference: Public Archives of Canada. B. Series, Vol. 214, p. 84

      "To His Excellency Frederick Haldimand, Esq. Governor General of Canada and Territories thereon depending General and Commander in Chief of all His Majesty's Forces therein, etc. "

      "The Memorial of Captain Daniel McAlpin of the 60th Regiment humbly sheweth Your Excellency's Memorialist having in concert with Lieutenant Colonel William Edmonston of the 48th Regiment proposed a plan for raising a battalion of his Majesty's loyal subjects in Albany and in the neighbouring counties.

      Such plan was laid before General Sir William Howe and His Excellency was pleased to approve of the same and he gave this instruction to engage the men, taking care not to appoint more than one captain, two subalterns, three sergeants, three corporals, and one drummer to every 50 men.

      In consequence of General Howe's instructions your Excellency's Memorialist employed proper people at a considerable expense to engage volunteers for this service and he was so successful that in six months time five hundred and seventy-two men were engaged, two hundred of which number joined General Burgoyne's army as will appear by a certificate signed by the Deputy Commissary of Musters.

      Your Excellency's Memorialist did appoint Mr. Peter Drumond to be captain of a company and several other good men to be subalterns. Captain Drummond had the misfortune to be taken prisoner in the field of battle on the 19th September 1777 when he was exerting himself in the execution of his duty and he has since suffered much, being a long time confined in irons in a dungeon. As your Excellency'' Memorialist did not appoint but one captain, five lieutenants, five ensigns, and one quarter master to the above number of men he humbly hopes that your Excellency will be good enough to support them in those different stations as they have sacrificed all they had for their loyalty. "

      Québec, Canada, 18 November, 1778 (Signed) Daniel McAlpin, Captain 60th Regiment

      Reference: "The United Empire Loyalists" by William Stewart Wallace
      "In 1776 Sir John Johnson fled to Canada with 300 Scottish dependants and the Mohawks under Chief Joseph Brant. He received a Colonel's commission to raise two Loyalist battalions which were known as the King's Royal Regiment, 1000 men. They were called the Royal Greens. "An offshoot of the first battalion of the Royal Greens was known as Jessup's Corps. This corps was with General Burgoyne's army at the Battle of Saratoga. "

      (Room 326, sec box 310 and 295, U. S. History, Revolution, Loyalists) Also see next card IA. A. N. Y. State-Detecting and defeating conspiracies. See S. L. V. See H. W. E. p. v. 19.

      "The township of Ernestown was given to Sir John Johnson with his company of U. E. Loyalists. Apparently land was selected by Lot. " "Colonel Rogers was given the township of Fredericksburg. " "Major Van Alstyne was given the township of Adelphustown. " "Colonel McDonnell was given the township of Marysborough (burg). "

      Collections New Brunswick Historical Society, Vol. 2, parts 4 and 5, Page 224.
      Roll of Officers of the British American or Loyalist Corps. No. 6 - Major McAlpins Royal Americans. (see Royal American Regiment or 60th. Of the British line, 4 battalions, organized in America about 1750).

      Page 165 - Royal American Regiment or 60th. Regiment of Foot, was raised in America about 1755. At that time it was commanded by General Sir Jeffrey Amherst. Robert Moncton was one of its colonels. The regiment was disbanded at the close of therRevolution.

      Army list, 1797 page 272 - 84th. Regiment Foot. Alex. MacLaughlan, Lieutenant 1. April 1795
      Page 131 - Alex. M'Laugjlan, Ensign, 16th Dec. 1795, 15th. (or the Yorkshire E. Riding) Regt. Of Foot.
      Jacob M'Lachlan, Ensign, 16th Dec. 1795, 15th. (or the Yorkshire E. Riding) Regt. Of Foot.

      Page 305 - D. M'Lachland, Lieutenant 4 Dec. 1796 and 5 Oct. 1795.

      Page 122 - John MacLachlan, Lieutenant 29 Apr. 1795.

      LIST OF OFFICERS OF THE ARMY AND ROYAL MARINES, 1820

      Page 564 - Alex. M'Lachlan, Ensign, 21 Apr. 1814 - placed on half pay 12 May 1819.
      Page 218 - Alex. Maclachlan, Lieutenant 10 May 1814 - Retired 23 June 1814. 49th. Regt. of Foot, The Princess Charlotte of Wales or the Hertford Regt.
      Page 270 - Alex. MacLachlan, 2nd. Lieutenant Rifle Brigade, 19 May 1814. Retired 10 Nov. 1814.

      The United Empire Loyalists by Edgerton Ryerson

      "The Americans inaugurated their Declaration of Independence by enacting that all United Empire Loyalists (or adherents to the Mother Country) were rebels and traitors; they followed the recognition of Independence by England with an order exiling such adherents from their territories. But while this policy depleted the USA of some of their best blood, it laid the foundation of the settlement and the institutions of the country which has since become the great, free and prosperous Dominion of Canada.

      Upper Canada was then unknown or known only as a region of dense wilderness and swamps; of venomous reptiles and beasts of prey, of fierce and numerous Indian tribes, of intense cold in winter; and with no redeeming feature except abundance of game and fish.

      After the War of Independence, many Loyalists went to Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and settle there. The British Commander of New York, USA having found out that Upper Canada was capable of supporting a numerous population along the great river and the lakes, undertook to send colonies of Loyalists there. Five vessels were procured and furnished to convey the first colony from New York, USA. They sailed round the coasts of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and up the St Lawrence to Sorel, Québec where they arrived in October 1784, they continued their voyage in boats, and reached their destination, Cataraqui, afterwards Kingston, in the month of July 1784. Other bands of Loyalists came by land over the military highway to Lower Canada, as far as Plattsburg, and then northward to Cornwall, Upper Canada and up the St Lawrence along the north side of which many of them settled.

      But the most common route was by way of the Hudson and Mohawk rivers, through Oneida Lake and down the Oswego River to Lake Ontario. Flat bottomed boats, specially built for purchased for the purpose by the Loyalists, were used in the journey. The portages, over which the boats had to be hauled and all their contents carried, are said to have been 30 miles long. On reaching Oswego, some of the Loyalists coasted along the eastern shore of Lake Ontario to Kingston, and thence up the Bay of Quinte; others went westward along the south shore of the lake to Niagara and Queenston. Some conveyed their boats over the portage of ten or twelve miles to Chippewa, thence up the river and into Lake Erie, settling chiefly in what was called "Long Point Country", now the of Norfolk. This journey of hardship, privation and exposure occupied tow or three months. The obstacles encountered may readily be imagined in a country where the primeval forest covered the earth, and where the only path was the lake or river. The parents and family of the writer of this history were from the middle of May to the middle of July making the journey in an open boat. Generally, tow or more families would unite in one company, and thus assist each other in carrying their boats and goods over the portages.

      "These excellent people" wrote Sir Richard Bonnycastle, "were willing to sacrifice life and fortune rather then forgo the enviable distinction of being British subjects". The stern adherence of the Pilgrim Fathers to their principles was quite equaled by the stern adherence of the Loyalists to their principles, but the privations and hardships experienced by many of the Loyalist patriots for years after the first settlement in Upper Canada where much more severe then anything experienced by the Puritans during the first years of their settlement in Massachusetts.
      Canada has indeed, a noble parentage, the remembrance of which its inhabitants may well cherish with respect, affection, and pride".

      May have been written by Edgerton Ross Laughlin
      Stone monuments tell the deeds,
      Of some great men, but some,
      As true and great have no such fame.
      Their lives, lived true and well,
      Are now reflected in their children's name.

      There is no stone at Alex Laughlen's head,
      No eulogy of what he did and said,
      Of how he left Scotland behind,
      In New York, USA a home to find:
      How he toiled all his life,
      Kept a little home and Wife,
      How the Revolution changed it all,
      Did his duty when he got the call,
      And enlisted in the British file:
      Of the many years in rebel prisons vile,
      How the jailors on him spat,
      Till it seemed his mind would snap:
      How the foe took all he had
      Except his Wife, his girl, his lad;
      How he bore both cold and damp
      On the long, long wintry tramp
      On the way to liberty true
      Land of Ontario, Canada, land of the new;
      How he worked with tools crude,
      Hewed out a home, simple and rude
      When his life on earth was through,
      Told his friends his wishes few
      "I love Ontario, Canada, bury me here
      Where all my friends will ever be near. "
      No monument did you say?
      What finer monument can you lay,
      Than a life, so good and true,
      That friends will miss you when

      The surname MacLaughlin, also spelt Laughlin, Lauchlan, Laughlan, MacLoughlin and McLaughlin, is used in modern Irish as the Anglicization of an Old Gaelic name borne by two entirely distinct Gaelic septs, the first originally called 'O' Maoilsheachlann' and Anglicized as O'Melaghlin up to the end of the 17th Century assumed the name MacLoughun in circa 1691. The territory of this sept lay in the central plains of Ireland, especially in Meath. The Gaelic prefix "O" indicates male descendant of, and "maol", the tonsured one, i.e. a devotee (of Saint Seachlann i.e. St Secundinus). This Maoilsheachlann from whom the family descends was better known as Malachy 11, High King of Ireland from 980 - 1002. The second MacLaughlin sept belonged to Innishowen Co. Donegal. The name means "son of (mac) Lochlann", a compound of the Norse elements "loch", a lake or fjord, plus "lann" land. The great leading men of this sept are frequently referred to in "The Annals of the Four Masters". Among the recordings in Ireland is the marriage of John McLaughlin and Elizabeth Crauffurd on June 23rd 1666 at Derry Cathedral, Templemore, Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of MacLochlann of Ulster, which was dated circa 1200, in the Annals of Medieval History (Counties Donegal and Derry), during the reign of King Cathal, Craobhdhearg - known as Red Hand, High King of Ireland, 1198 - 1224. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Sources 
    1. [S424] The Works of M. E. Laughlin and E. R. Laughlin, 1955 2nd Edition, Mary Elizabeth Bowyer Laughlin and Edgerton Ross Laughlin.

    2. [S621] US, Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, (Location: https://www.rca.org/rca-basics/archives;), Holland Society of New York; New York, New York; Poughkeepsie and The Flats, Book 39.
      Record for Mary Snyder