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Hyde, Jonathan 1789 
 
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A Family History Robertsons of Norfolk
A Family History Robertsons of Norfolk
 
 
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Abbey Family Crest
Abbey Family Crest
Recorded in many spelling forms including the French and English Abba, Abbay, Abbe, Abbey, Abbate, Abbatt, Labbe, Labbey, Labey, Abade, the Scottish Abbie and Abbe, and the Italian Abbattini, Dell'Abate or Degli Abbati, this most interesting and unusual surname is of Olde French pre 10th century origins. It derives from the word "abet" which usually means a priest, but may have also, particularly in Italy, have referrred to a local chief or an official master of ceremonies. This indicates that several origins are possible, including a nickname for one who was thought to be rather "priestly" in his characteristics, or an occupational or status name for a local chief or official, or that it may be theatrical and a "casting" name for an actor, one who played the part of a priest in the famous travelling theatres of the medieval period. Despite the first recording shown below the name is unlikely, as a hereditary surname, to have originated from an actual abbe or priest. These members of the clergy since the 11th century, have been expected to be unmarried and celibate. Whether they were or not is open to some discussion, particulary as occasionally this surname is recorded as a patronymic or diminutive, indicating the "son of the abbe!". The surname is first recorded in any form anywhere in the world in England in 1177, when Ralph Le Abbe appears in the charters of London during the reign of King Henry 11 (1154 - 1189). Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
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Abbott Family Crest
Abbott Family Crest
This ancient surname is generally of early English origins, predating the Anglo-Saxons and Normans. It was usually an occupational name for a person employed by an abbot, or perhaps a nickname for one who was thought to conduct himself like an abbot! It is also possible that in some cases the name may refer to the offspring of an Abbot, however as the clergy were supposed to be celibrate there is an area of doubt. The surname also occurs widely in Scotland where it is either of English origin or a translation of MacNab, which also means 'son of the abbot'. The original spelling was 'abbod', Ralph Abbod being recorded in Somerset in 1272. The patronymic is usually indicated by the suffix 's', and very occasionally as 'Abbotson', Dorothy Abbotson being recorded at St Botolphs Bishopgate, London, on November 11th 1823. The various spellings include such rare forms as Habbett and Labbet. Early recording examples include Walter Abat, in the Assize Court Rolls of Yorkshire in 1219, and Elizabeth Abbet, who married Henry Waterman at the church of St Lawrence Poutney, London, on January 11th 1600. George Abbot (1562 - 1633) was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury in 1611, whilst Elizabeth Abbitt was recorded as 'living in Virginea, over the river' on February 16th 1623, making her one of America's earliest colonists. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name has the blazon of a red field, a gold chevron between three golden pears. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter Abbot, which was dated circa 1190, in the Danelaw records of Lincolnshire, during the reign of King Richard 1, known as 'Richard the Lionheart', 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Abbott, Albert Wellington
Abbott, Albert Wellington
 
 
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Abbott, Albert Wellington 1920
Abbott, Albert Wellington 1920
 
 
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Abbott, Albert Wellington WWI Draft Card page 1
Abbott, Albert Wellington WWI Draft Card page 1
 
 
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Abbott, Alice Marie
Abbott, Alice Marie
 
 
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Abbott, Alice Marie 1920
Abbott, Alice Marie 1920
 
 
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Abbott, Alice Marie 1930
Abbott, Alice Marie 1930
 
 
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Abbott, Alice Marie Grave Stone
Abbott, Alice Marie Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
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Abbott, Allen Carl
Abbott, Allen Carl
 
 
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Abbott, Allen Carl and Dorothy
Abbott, Allen Carl and Dorothy
 
 
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Abbott, Clara Lillian 1910
Abbott, Clara Lillian 1910
 
 
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Abbott, Gilbert Franklin 1910
Abbott, Gilbert Franklin 1910
 
 
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Abbott, Gilbert Franklin 1920
Abbott, Gilbert Franklin 1920
 
 
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Abbott, John William
Abbott, John William
 
 
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Abbott, John William
Abbott, John William
 
 
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Abbott, Julia Ann 1920
Abbott, Julia Ann 1920
 
 
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Abell Family Crest
Abell Family Crest
This most interesting and unusual surname is Anglo-Scottish. It was mainly introduced by returning 12th century Crusaders and pilgrims from the Holy Land. 'Abel' derives from the Hebrew given name 'Hevel' meaning 'breath or vigour', and was presumably a name of endearment or possibly a nickname. As a personal name 'Abel' (Hevel) was borne by the son of Adam, who was murdered by his brother Cain. It was very popular as a given name in Christendom during the Middle Ages, when there was a cult of 'suffering innocence' which Abel represented. For reasons unclear the early surname was widespread in the east of England and Southern Scotland, and is well represented in its various forms in the registers of the area. The surname is now recorded in the modern spellings of Abel, Able, Abele, Abelle, and the patronymic Abels, Abeles, Abells, Abelson and Ableson. Early examples of the surname recordings include Richard Abel of Buckinghamshire in the 1273 Hundred rolls of the county, and Thomas Abell in the Subsidy Rolls of Yorkshire for the year 1301. The surname is also well recorded in Scotland from an early date, Master Abel being recorded in the rolls of the abbey of Kelso in 1235, whilst Thomas Abell, was a burgess of Edinburgh in the year 1387. The coat of arms is very distinctive having the blazon of a silver field, charged with twelve gold fleur de lis on a saltire of blue. The crest being an arm in armour holding a sword enfiled with a wreath. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Abel, which was dated 1197, in the Pipe Rolls of the county of Essex, during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Abell, Ira 1790 is this him before marriage
Abell, Ira 1790 is this him before marriage
 
 
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Abell, Joanna New England The Great Migration
Abell, Joanna New England The Great Migration
 
 
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Abell, Julitta Grave Stone
Abell, Julitta Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
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Abell, Mary Margaret Tracy Grave Stone
Abell, Mary Margaret Tracy Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
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Abell, Oliver 1790
Abell, Oliver 1790
 
 
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Abell, Oliver Grave Stone
Abell, Oliver Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
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Abell, Simon Grave Stone
Abell, Simon Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
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Abell, Theophilus Grave Stone
Abell, Theophilus Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
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Abell, Thomas 1790
Abell, Thomas 1790
 
 
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Abernathy Family Crest
Abernathy Family Crest
Scottish: habitational name from Abernethy in southeastern Perthshire. The place name is of Pictish origin, meaning ‘mouth of the river Nethy’.  
 
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Abrahams Family Crest
Abrahams Family Crest
This long-established surname, recorded in the spellings of Abraham, Abrahams, Abrahamson, the latter two being patronymics, and the abbreviated Abrams, also a apparent patronymic, is of 12th century origin, and a 'Crusader' introduction into Britain. As such it was not Jewish, although of Hebrew influence. It is one of a group such as Isaac, Joseph, and Abel, which were given by the returning Christian soldiers to their sons in recognition of their 'visit' to the Holy Land. These subsequently developed into English surnames in their own right. 'Abraham' translates as 'The father of the nation', and as such was borne by the first of the Jewish patriarchs, (Genesis 11-25). The 1086 Domesday Book for London refers to 'Abraham', a priest in the established (Christian) church, whilst in 1170 Abraham de Stradtuna was recorded in the Danelaw rolls of Lincolnshire. As a Jewish surname it was revived after the 'reign' of Oliver Cromwell (1649 - 1658), who in 1655 repealed the exile order of Edward 1st in 1290, and allowed the re-settlement of the Jewish people in Britain. The earliest recordings include John Abraham of Bedford in the Hundred Rolls of 1273, and Magota Abrahams in the 1379 Poll Tax rolls of Yorkshire. Later recordings include Sarah Abram, who was christened at the church of St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London, on November 5th 1646, whilst on June 17th 1666 Richard Abrahams was christened at St Dunstans in the East, Stepney. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name has a shield of lozengy, gold and red, on a black chief the sun in his splendour, gold. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Abraham, which was dated 1197, in the pipe rolls of Northamptonshire, during the reign of King Richard 1st, known as 'The Lionheart', 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Abrahams, Rebecca Leah Birth Index
Abrahams, Rebecca Leah Birth Index
 
 
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Abrams Family Crest
Abrams Family Crest
This long-established surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a patronymic form of the Hebrew male given name "Avraham", originally "Abram", "high father", later changed to "Abraham", "father of a multitude (of nations)". This name was borne by the first of the Jewish patriarchs, ancestor of all the Israelites (Genesis 11-25), and Abraham was the name of a priest in the Domesday Book of 1086. In 1170, one Abraham de Stradtuna was noted in the Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire. This personal name was used to some extent among Christians in the Middle Ages, and has always been a popular Jewish given name. It was greatly revived after the Reformation, and was particularly popular in the Low Countries where it reverted to its original form of Abram, which is still used there, as it is in Wales. The first bearer of the extended form of the surname was John Abraham (Northamptonshire, 1193), and in 1273, one John Abraam was noted in the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire. Modern patronymic forms include: Abrahams, Abrams, Abrahamson and Abramson. On November 5th 1646, Sarah, daughter of Andrew and Gillian Abrams, was christened at St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name is a shield lozengy gold and red, on a black chief the sun in his splendour, gold, the Crest being a cap of maintenance decorated with a plume of ostrich feathers, all proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Abram, which was dated 1252, in the "Chartulary of the Monastery of Ramsey", Huntingdonshire, during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Abrams, Caroline Birth Record
Abrams, Caroline Birth Record
 
 
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Abrams, William Henry and Julia Lyons Grave Stone
Abrams, William Henry and Julia Lyons Grave Stone
Status: Not yet located;  
 
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Abramson Family Crest
Abramson Family Crest
This long-established surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a patronymic form of the Hebrew male given name "Avraham", originally "Abram", "high father", later changed to "Abraham", "father of a multitude (of nations)". This name was borne by the first of the Jewish patriarchs, ancestor of all the Israelites (Genesis 11-25), and Abraham was the name of a priest in the Domesday Book of 1086. In 1170, one Abraham de Stradtuna was noted in the Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire. This personal name was used to some extent among Christians in the Middle Ages, and has always been a popular Jewish given name. It was greatly revived after the Reformation, and was particularly popular in the Low Countries where it reverted to its original form of Abram, which is still used there, as it is in Wales. The first bearer of the extended form of the surname was John Abraham (Northamptonshire, 1193), and in 1273, one John Abraam was noted in the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire. Modern patronymic forms include: Abrahams, Abrams, Abrahamson and Abramson. On November 5th 1646, Sarah, daughter of Andrew and Gillian Abrams, was christened at St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name is a shield lozengy gold and red, on a black chief the sun in his splendour, gold, the Crest being a cap of maintenance decorated with a plume of ostrich feathers, all proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Abram, which was dated 1252, in the "Chartulary of the Monastery of Ramsey", Huntingdonshire, during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Ackerman Family Crest
Ackerman Family Crest
This long-established surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a status name for a bond tenant who was employed as a ploughman for a manor. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "aecermann", a compound of "aecer", field, ploughed land, cognate with the Old Norse "akr", and "mann", man. On many medieval manors there were separate tenements held by "acremen" in return for ploughing service, and a quotation from "Lay le Freine" reads, "The foules up, and song on bough, And acremen yeld to the plough". Early examples of the surname include: Robert le Akerman (Essex, 1233); Roger le Acreman (Oxfordshire, 1273); and Hugh Akerman (Cambridgeshire, 1273). The "Historical English Dictionary", dated 1389, tells us that "both prestis and knightis mosten bicome acremen and heerdis". In the modern idiom the surname has four spelling variations: Ackerman(n), Akerman and Acreman. On August 15th 1568, Anna Ackerman and John Habet were married at St. Dionis Backchurch, London. A notable namebearer mentioned in the "National Biography" was Rudolph Ackermann who, in 1801, patented a method for making articles waterproof, and established art lithography in England (1817). A Coat of Arms granted to the Ackerman family in 1761 is described thus: Quarterly per fesse indented first and fourth gules, in chief a maunch argent, in base an acorn sprig or, second and 3rd or, three dragons' heads couped of the first. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Acreman, which was dated 1100, in the "Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey", Huntingdonshire, during the reign of King Henry 1, known as "The Lion of Justice", 1100 - 1135. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Ackerman, Philip James 1910
Ackerman, Philip James 1910
 
 
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Ackley Family Crest
Ackley Family Crest
English: from any of various places named in Old English as ac leah ‘oak clearing’. Possible sources include Acle in Norfolk, Aykley in Durham, and Ackley Farm in Powys. Compare Oakley, which has the same origin. Americanized spelling of Swiss German Egli. 
 
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Acott Family Crest
Acott Family Crest
This unusual name is a variation of the English and French surname "Court", also found as "A'Court" with the Anglo-Norman French preposition. It was used as an occupational or a habitation name for one who lived or worked at a manorial court. The derivation is from the Middle English "court(e)", or "curt", meaning "court", from the Latin "cohors", a yard or enclosure. The word was mainly used with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor. It is also possible that "Acott" is derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "atte cott", which denotes residence "at the cottage". One Joseph Acott was christened in London in 1747, and Elizabeth Acott married James Cary on December 29th 1785, at St. Michael's, Bath, Somerset. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Joan Acott, which was dated June 22nd 1673, marriage to William Manchester, at St. Dunstan's, Stepney, London, during the reign of King Charles 11, known as "The Merry Monarch", 1660 - 1685. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Adalbert Marquis of Tuscany
Adalbert Marquis of Tuscany
 
 
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Adams, Eliza L
Adams, Eliza L
Status: Located;  
 
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Adams, Eliza Lucinda Birth Record
Adams, Eliza Lucinda Birth Record
 
 
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Adamson, Oliver James World War 2 Record
Adamson, Oliver James World War 2 Record
 
 
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Adela de Tours
Adela de Tours
 
 
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Adelaide of Aquitaine
Adelaide of Aquitaine
 
 
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Adèle de France
Adèle de France
Status: Located;  
 
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Adèle de France Grave Stone
Adèle de France Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
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Adelle Vermandois
Adelle Vermandois
 
 
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Adgate, Asa 1800
Adgate, Asa 1800
 
 

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